Perhaps La Belle Dame sans Merci is attracted tothis kind of man.

La Belle Dame sans Merci Summary | GradeSaver

The La Belle Dame sans Merci Community Note includes chapter-by-chapter summary and analysis, La Belle Dame Sans Merci Essays character list, theme list, historical context, author

La Belle Dame sans Merci essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of La Belle

The La Belle Dame sans Merci Community Note includes chapter-by-chapter summary and analysis, character list, theme list, historical La Belle Dame Sans Merci Essays context, author

The  section for La Belle Dame sans Merci is a greatresource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

Works Cited

Keats, John. "La Belle Dame Sans Merci." Poetry Foundation. 29 Nov 2014. Web.

Keats, John. "Ode to a Grecian Urn." Poetry Foundation. 29 Nov 2014. Web.

Portrayal of Women in La Belle Dame sans Merci by …

Despite of his profound distrust towards women, Keats is a deeply romantic person at heart who is quite impressionable to feminine beauty and their bewitching graces. As a result, he often harbors resentment towards his inability to resist against the feminine charms. Therefore La dame sans merci is a poem that perfectly encapsulates the author’s inner conflict with regards to women. Like the knight in the poem, Keats’ feelings towards women are a mixture of fascination and distrust. In the poem, the knight is an emotionally impressionable womanizer who like to accost the first beautiful woman that comes into his sight. He is an experienced suitor who is well-versed in the arts of seduction. He makes garlands for the lady, kisses her and puts her onto his horse. He is a willing participant in this relationship and assumes full responsibility should any misfortune arises from this liaison. Like the author, the knight in the poem is someone who entertains misogynistic feelings. Instead of facing up to his own share of responsibility, he lays all the blames squarely at the woman when the liaison comes to an end. He views himself as an innocent victim of feminine wiles. In fact, he was a womanizer who could not come to terms with the idea of being thwarted in love. He is a domineering suitor who wants to keep his lady firmly under his thumbs. Just like author who likes to keep women in their places, the knight is also a patriarch who can not stomach the fact that a member of the “weaker sex” has chosen to elude his control by abandoning him. After being abandoned by the lady, the knight transforms himself from her admirer into her bitter detractor. He tells a moralistic tale to the audience, painting their story as the tale of a virtuous knight being seduced by a pitiless woman, and thus warning the world of the dangers of women’s inconstancy. The poet uses the knight as a mouthpiece to unleash his profound anxieties towards the feminine sex.

La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad by John Keats | …

La Belle Dame sans Merci study guide contains a biography of John Keats, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

La Belle Dame sans Merci Study Guide: Analysis | …

"La Belle Dame Sans Merci" seems, on the surface, to be just another poem about knights who fall in love with beautiful (in this case, fairy or elfish) ladies. But wait: in this poem, the guy in question is literally on the verge of death because of his romantic encounter with this woman. What's the deal with that? She didn't stab him or anything – the poem isn't explicit about why the knight is dying. It's left partly to our imagination.

So what kills the knight? He becomes so enraptured with this pretty fairy lady that he forgets everything else. Her kisses put him into a coma, and that's how the speaker of the poem finds him. Ultimately, this poem is about the dangers of obsession, in general: drug addiction, romantic or erotic obsession, you name it. Keats seems to suggest that the fate of his "knight at arms" could happen to any of us, at any time. So whenever you're tempted to neglect your responsibilities in order to feed an obsession, you should think about what happened to the "knight at arms" in Keats's poem.


Read this essay on John Keats La Belle Dame Sans Merci

La Belle Dame sans Merci essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of La Belle Dame sans Merci by John Keats.

Keats' "La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad" (1820) - …

"La Belle Dame sans Merci" or "The Beautiful Lady without Pity" is the title of an early fifteenth-century French poem by Alain Chartier which belongs to the tradition of courtly love. Keats appropriates this phrase for a ballad which has been generally read as the story of a seductive and treacherous woman who tempts men away from the real world and then leaves them, their dreams unfulfilled and their lives blighted. For all the beguiling simplicity of the surfaces of this literary ballad, it is one of the most difficult of Keats's poems to explain, and open to many interpretations. It has been alternately suggested, for example, that it is about the wasting power of sexual love and / or the poet's infatuation with his muse. This particular analysis will examine the `La Belle Dame sans Merci' as a poem about a femme fatale and offer a feminist interpretation of the ballad. A femme fatale or fatal woman conventionally tempts man with her beauty and ultimately causes his destruction. There are many such figures in traditional supernatural ballads concerned with a faery's seduction of a human; notable examples include Tam Lin and Thomas the Rhymer.

Free Essays on La Belle Dame Sans Merci By Keats - …

To start with, he identifies her as a supernatural being, a `faery's child' with `wild wild eyes' suggestive perhaps of madness. She speaks a strange language, and in her elfin grotto she lulls him to sleep. There may be a suggestion here that she is potentially treacherous since `lull' can denote an attempt to calm someone's fears or suspicions by deception. The lady's responsibility for his condition seems to be confirmed in the dream he has of the death of pale kings, princes, and warriors who claim 'La Belle Dame sans Merci / Hath thee in thrall!' `And this is why I sojourn here' he tells his questioner, apparently referring back to this 'horrid warning' of the dream. He stays because he is in thrall to the beautiful lady without pity.