Bones, Bodies, Behavior: Essays on Biological Anthropology.

Essays on Biological Anthropology.

In this course, we will unveil the chemical “magic” that dictates when and how the human body behaves, in its everyday grind to keep us alive. Every biological process in our body, from the most basic function of glucose utilization to complicated pathways of drug metabolism, heavily depends on basic concepts of chemistry in order to function. Without...

In this course, we will unveil the chemical “magic” that dictates when and how the human body behaves, in its everyday grind to keep us alive. Every biological process in our body, from the most basic function of glucose utilization to complicated pathways of drug metabolism, heavily depends on basic concepts of chemistry in order to function. Without...

Taught by a practicing mental health counselor, "Brain and Behavior" will provide students with a multifactorial perspective on psychopathology. We will delve into illnesses such as depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and substance use disorders … exploring the biological, social and cognitive causes of mental illness.
Students...

Samuel, Geoffrey. 1990. Mind, Body and Culture. Anthropology and the Biological Interface. Cambridge University Press.

Human evolution is the lengthy process of change by which people originated from apelike ancestors starting nearly five million years ago. The modern scientific study of human evolution is called paleoanthropology A subfield of anthropology, this discipline searches for the roots of human physical traits, culture, and behavior. It attempts to answer questions: What makes us human? When and why did we begin to walk upright? How did our brains, language, art, music, and religion develop? By approaching these questions from a variety of directions, using information learned from other disciplines such as molecular biology, paleontology, archaeology, sociology, and biology, we continue to increase knowledge of our evolutionary origins.

Bones, bodies, behavior : essays on biological anthropology

In recent decades, biological and social scientists have made impressive strides in understanding our complex physical and cultural origins. Their research has revealed gradual alterations in our genetic structure, as well as shifts in culture and behavior, that have transformed humankind into the planet-dominant species.

Project MUSE - Bones, Bodies amd Behavior

(ed) Bones, Bodies, Behavior.

Biological anthropology (also known as bioanthropology and physical anthropology) is a branch of that studies the physical development of the human species. It plays an important part in (the study of human origins) and in (the analysis and identification of human remains for legal purposes). It draws upon human (body measurements), () and human (the study of bones) and includes , the study of human brain evolution, and of culture as neurological adaptation to environment.

Bones, Bodies, Behavior_ Essays - George W. Stocking …

The nomenclature of the field is not exact: the relevant subdivision of the is the Biological Anthropology Section while the principal professional organization is the . The term "biological anthropology" emerged with the rise of genetics and incorporates as well as primate .


Bones, Bodies, Behavior: Essays on Biological Anthropology by George W Stocking, Jr

Approximately one hundred thousand years ago, or perhaps somewhat earlier, anatomically modern humans appear in the fossil records of the and Africa; they are similar both cranially and postcranially to modern humans today, yet these earliest forms left no archaeological evidence to lead us to believe they had incorporated a modern behavioral repertoire. At seventy to fifty thousand years ago, we detect no change in the morphology of early anatomically modern humans, but there is dramatic evidence of a change in behavior. Splendid murals painted on the walls and ceilings of caves, musical instruments, and elaborate notations, together with a complex technology of stone and bone, are known from western beginning about thirty thousand years ago. But these dramatic expressions were rather late, compared to the suggestions of similar symbolic behaviors known from as long ago as seventy thousand years, and maybe even more, in Africa. Similarly, modern humans had arrived in by sixty thousand years ago, and an effectively modern level of cognition must have been present in these people to have allowed them to cross at least fifty miles of open ocean to get there. Obviously, a cognitive gulf was breached at some time after about seventy thousand years ago (perhaps earlier). This arose first of all in Africa, and spread thence to other parts of the world. Once was in this behavioral mode, the speed of technological and other behavioral innovation (formerly episodic and rare) increased out of all proportion to what had gone before. At what point religious awareness was acquired is not known, but it was probably part of an overall biological potential for modern cognition that was achieved as a single "package." The huge range of behaviors made possible by this potential was only gradually discoveredand indeed, is still enlarging its behavioral range today.

Bones, Bodies, Behavior_ Essays ..

Hatty, Suzanne E.; James Hatty. 1999. The Disordered Body. Epidemic Disease and Cultural Transformation. SUNY Series in Medical Anthropology. Albany: SUNY Press. Study of 3 Medieval and early Renaissance epidemics to find precedents of current anxieties about bodies and places.

Bones, Bodies, Behavior ESSAYS ON ..

These images are buttressed by a major essay, “Rubbings of Reality,” in which Taylor explores the use of bones in the religious rituals of native inhabitants of the Western desert and, more broadly, the appearance of bones in myth and religious reality.

Meditating on the way in which bones paradoxically embody both the personal and the impersonal—at one time they are our very substance, but eventually they become our last remnants, anonymous, memorializing oblivion—Taylor here suggests ways in which natural processes can be thought of as art, and bones as art objects.