The United States Healthcare Systems

It is an interesting debt as to which provides a superior healthcare system.

One thing Americans and Canadianscan agree on is that we don't want each other's health care systems. In truth,most Americans don't know how Canada's system works and Canadians don't knowmuch about the U.S. system.

Australian commission on safety and quality in healthcare is also one such innovative step that aims at provision of a universal healthcare service to all across Australia....

First of an on-going seriesresulting from thge author's recent monthlong visit to Canada as aFulbright Senior Specialist where she lectured about the American healthcare systemand learned much about Canadian medical care.

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Fuchs and Joan Sokolovsky, "The Canadian Health Care System," , Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 20 February 1990, p. 13.

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Fuchs and Joan Sokolovsky, "The Canadian Health Care System," , Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 20 February 1990, p. 9.

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As of 2010 the US healthcare system currently ranks the 37th best out of 190 countries (Murray).

In discussions of health care reform, the Canadian system is often held up as a possible model for the U.S. The two countries' health care systems are very different-Canada has a single-payer, mostly publicly-funded system, while the U.S. has a multi-payer, heavily private system-but the countries appear to be culturally similar, suggesting that it might be possible for the U.S. to adopt the Canadian system.

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Much of the appeal of the Canadian system is that it seems to do more for less. Canada provides universal access to health care for its citizens, while nearly one in five non-elderly Americans is uninsured. Canada spends far less of its GDP on health care (10.4 percent, ver-sus 16 percent in the U.S.) yet performs better than the U.S. on two commonly cited health outcome measures, the infant mortality rate and life expectancy.


Comparing the U.S. and Canadian Health Care Systems. In discussions of health care reform, the Canadian system is often held up as a possible model for the U.S.

In "Health Status, Health Care, and Inequality: Canada vs. the U.S.," (NBER Working Paper ) June O'Neill and Dave M. O'Neill take a closer look at the performance of the U.S. and Canadian health care systems. The authors examine whether the Canadian system delivers better health outcomes and distributes health resources more equitably than the U.S. system.

Us vs Canada Health Essay - 1268 Words

Despite the mandate of the Canada health act, which was meant to assure universality, comprehensiveness, equitable access, public administration and portability of our health care system, (Braithwaite 17), Canadians today make the issue of health care their most important political concern.

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One of the biggest crises the Canadian health care system faces is for strange reasons not in the spotlight when debating the issues, that is the brain drain-Canada losing highly skilled physicians and health care workers to other countries like the U.S....

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The authors begin by examining the evidence on health outcomes. They note that the infant mortality rate and life expectancy are affected by many factors other than the health care system. For example, low birthweight-a phenomenon known to be related to substance abuse and smoking-is more common in the U.S. For babies in the same birthweight range, infant mortality rates in the two countries are similar. In fact, if Canada had the same proportion of low birthweight babies as the U.S., the authors project that it would have a slightly higher infant mortality rate. Thus, the authors conclude that differences in infant mortality have more to do with differences in behavior than with the health care systems.

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A similar argument may be made for life expectancy. The gap in life expectancy among young adults is mostly explained by the higher rate of mortality in the U.S. from accidents and homicides. At older ages much of the gap is due to a higher rate of heart disease-related mortality in the U.S. While this could be related to better treatment of heart disease in Canada, factors such as the U.S.'s higher obesity rate (33 percent of U.S. women are obese, vs. 19 percent in Canada) surely play a role.