Discuss this, comparing and contrasting the poems.

Lyric poems can easily be compared to one another based on certain criteria.

I will also be writing on "digging", which takes us back once again to his farm but instead not wanting to follow in his fathers footsteps So basically I will be writing about how the poems contrast to his rural childhood and I'll explain the quotes and the poems....

Choose two of the poems you are studying to try this exercise (you might need to replace ‘love’ with a different theme, depending on the collection of poetry you are focusing on).

You will be asked to compare two or more poems in your exam. You will usually be given some of the poems which you must write about, and you might need to choose other poems to compare them with.

The two poems I will be writing on will contrast and his memories on his rural childhood.

"'There has always appeared to me a vicious mixture of the figurative with the real in this admired passage. The first two lines may barely pass, as not bad. But the hands laid in the earth must mean the identical five-fingered organs of the body; and how does this consist with their occupation of swaying rods, unless their owner had been a schoolmaster; or waking lyres, unless he were literally a harper by profession? Hands that ''might have held the plough'' would have some sense, for that work is strictly manual; the others only emblematically or pictorially so. Kings nowadays sway no rods, alias sceptres, except on their coronation day; and poets do not necessarily strum upon the harp or fiddle as poets.' (Charles Lamb in The London Magazine, December 1822.)
But much good poetry would be destroyed by this criticism: e.g. 'Or whether thou to our moist vows deny'd, / Sleep'st by the fable of Bellerus old.' (Lycidas, 159.) The body of a dead man ('this identical' four-limbed structure of flesh and bone) cannot be said to 'sleep by' a 'fable', except figuratively. Yet the beauty of the passage depends upon this 'mixture of the figurative with the real'; suggesting, as it does, that the young man whom they all knew is already numbered with the heroes of half-remembered myth."

How is the theme of love presented in the two poems?

"'There has always appeared to me a vicious mixture of the figurative with the real in this admired passage. The first two lines may barely pass, as not bad. But the hands laid in the earth must mean the identical five-fingered organs of the body; and how does this consist with their occupation of swaying rods, unless their owner had been a schoolmaster; or waking lyres, unless he were literally a harper by profession? Hands that ''might have held the plough'' would have some sense, for that work is strictly manual; the others only emblematically or pictorially so. Kings nowadays sway no rods, alias sceptres, except on their coronation day; and poets do not necessarily strum upon the harp or fiddle as poets.' (Charles Lamb in The London Magazine, December 1822.)
But much good poetry would be destroyed by this criticism: e.g. 'Or whether thou to our moist vows deny'd, / Sleep'st by the fable of Bellerus old.' (Lycidas, 159.) The body of a dead man ('this identical' four-limbed structure of flesh and bone) cannot be said to 'sleep by' a 'fable', except figuratively. Yet the beauty of the passage depends upon this 'mixture of the figurative with the real'; suggesting, as it does, that the young man whom they all knew is already numbered with the heroes of half-remembered myth."

A good comparative essay is like a multi-layered sandwich:

The result is two glaringly different poems that goes to prove how very different people are.

"This stanza is capable of two constructions, according as we take prey in agreement with who or with being. I prefer the former: - For what person, a prey to forgetfulness, ever resigned his life, and left the world, without casting a regretful look behind? If prey be taken with being, then ''to dumb Forgetfulness a prey'' is the completion of the predicate resigned, and we have two questions asked: - For who ever resigned this life to be a prey to forgetfulness, and left the world without, etc.?"

Comparing and Contrasting Two Poems by the Same Author

"This stanza is capable of two constructions, according as we take prey in agreement with who or with being. I prefer the former: - For what person, a prey to forgetfulness, ever resigned his life, and left the world, without casting a regretful look behind? If prey be taken with being, then ''to dumb Forgetfulness a prey'' is the completion of the predicate resigned, and we have two questions asked: - For who ever resigned this life to be a prey to forgetfulness, and left the world without, etc.?"


The Best Way to Write a Compare and Contrast Essay - wikiHow

"This stanza is capable of two constructions, according as we take prey in agreement with who or with being. I prefer the former: - For what person, a prey to forgetfulness, ever resigned his life, and left the world, without casting a regretful look behind? If prey be taken with being, then ''to dumb Forgetfulness a prey'' is the completion of the predicate resigned, and we have two questions asked: - For who ever resigned this life to be a prey to forgetfulness, and left the world without, etc.?"

Writing Across the Curriculum: Our Compare and Contrast Workshop & Guide using comparative thinking throughout the writing process in every content area

"The link in G[ray].'s thought is not clear, since the causal connection implied could be with either the memorials or the texts in the previous stanza: man's reluctance to be forgotten after death could have caused either the inscriptions on the graves or the need to have texts on the graves to teach those still living how to consider death. But these two lines are ambiguous in themselves and could be read in three ways: 'For who, about to become a prey to dumb forgetfulness (= oblivion)'; 'For who ever resigned this being to dumb forgetfulness (= oblivion)'; and 'For who was already so much the prey of forgetfulness (= insensibility) as to resign' etc. The first of these readings seems most likely: for 'forgetfulness' as 'oblivion' see Spenser, Ruins of Time 377-8: 'And them immortal make, which els would die / In foule forgetfulnesse'; and Visions of Bellay i 3: 'the forgetfulnes of sleepe'. See also Par. Lost ii 146-51: 'for who would loose, / Though full of pain, this intellectual being, / Those thoughts that wander through Eternity, / To perish rather, swallowd up and lost / In the wide womb of uncreated night, / Devoid of sense and motion?'"

This handout will help you determine if an assignment is asking for comparing and contrasting, generate similarities and differences, and decide a focus.

"The link in G[ray].'s thought is not clear, since the causal connection implied could be with either the memorials or the texts in the previous stanza: man's reluctance to be forgotten after death could have caused either the inscriptions on the graves or the need to have texts on the graves to teach those still living how to consider death. But these two lines are ambiguous in themselves and could be read in three ways: 'For who, about to become a prey to dumb forgetfulness (= oblivion)'; 'For who ever resigned this being to dumb forgetfulness (= oblivion)'; and 'For who was already so much the prey of forgetfulness (= insensibility) as to resign' etc. The first of these readings seems most likely: for 'forgetfulness' as 'oblivion' see Spenser, Ruins of Time 377-8: 'And them immortal make, which els would die / In foule forgetfulnesse'; and Visions of Bellay i 3: 'the forgetfulnes of sleepe'. See also Par. Lost ii 146-51: 'for who would loose, / Though full of pain, this intellectual being, / Those thoughts that wander through Eternity, / To perish rather, swallowd up and lost / In the wide womb of uncreated night, / Devoid of sense and motion?'"