Richard II New Critical Essays Shakespeare Criticism st Edition

“William Shakespeare was a professional actor, a businessman, and a playwright.

The picturesque contrasts of character in this play are almost as remarkable as the depth of the passion. The Moor Othello, the gentle Desdemona, the villain Iago, the good-natured Cassio, the fool Roderigo, present a range and variety of character as striking and palpable as that produced by the opposition of costume in a picture. Their distinguishing qualities stand out to the mind's eye, so that even when we are not thinking of their actions or sentiments, the idea of their persons is still as present to us as ever. These characters and the images they stamp upon the mind are the farthest asunder possible, the distance between them is immense: yet the compass of knowledge and invention which the poet has shewn in embodying these extreme creations of his genius is only greater than the truth and felicity with which he has identified each character with itself, or blended their different qualities together in the same story. What a contrast the character of Othello forms to that of Iago! At the same time, the force of conception with which these two figures are opposed to each other is rendered still more intense by the complete consistency with which the traits of each character are brought out in a state of the highest finishing. The making one black and the other white, the one unprincipled, the other unfortunate in the extreme, would have answered the common purposes of effect, and satisfied the ambition of an ordinary painter of character. Shakespear has laboured the finer shades of difference in both with as much care and skill as if he had had to depend on the execution alone for the success of his design. On the other hand, Desdemona and Æmilia are not meant to be opposed with anything like strong contrast to each other. Both are, to outward appearance, characters of common life, not more distinguished than women usually are, by difference of rank and situation. The difference of their thoughts and sentiments is however laid open, their minds are separated from each other by signs as plain and as little to be mistaken as the complexions of their husbands.

The movement of the passion in Othello is exceedingly different from that of Macbeth. In Macbeth there is a violent struggle between oppo-site feelings, between ambition and the stings of conscience, almost from first to last: in Othello, the doubtful conflict between contrary passions, though dreadful, continues only for a short time, and the chief interest is excited by the alternate ascendancy of different passions, by the entire and unforeseen change from the fondest love and most unbounded confidence to the tortures of jealousy and the madness of hatred. The revenge of Othello, after it has once taken thorough possession of his mind, never quits it, but grows stronger and stronger at every moment of its delay. The nature of the Moor is noble, confiding, tender, and generous; but his blood is of the most inflammable kind; and being once roused by a sense of his wrongs, he is stopped by no considerations of remorse or pity till he has given a loose to all the dictates of his rage and his despair. It is in working his noble nature up to this extremity through rapid but gradual transitions, in raising passion to its height from the smallest beginnings and in spite of all obstacles, in painting the expiring conflict between love and hatred, tenderness and resentment, jealousy and remorse, in unfolding the strength and the weakness of our nature, in uniting sublimity of thought with the anguish of the keenest woe, in putting in motion the various impulses that agitate this our mortal being, and at last blending them in that noble tide of deep and sustained passion, impetuous but majestic, that "flows on to the Propontic, and knows no ebb," that Shakespear has shewn the mastery of his genius and of his power over the human heart. The third act of OTHELLO is his finest display, not of knowledge or passion separately, but of the two combined, of the knowledge of character with the expression of passion, of consummate art in the keeping up of appearances with the profound workings of nature, and the convulsive movements of uncontroulable agony, of the power of inflicting torture and of suffering it. Not only is the tumult of passion in Othello's mind heaved up from the very bottom of the soul, but every the slightest undulation of feeling is seen on the surface as it arises from the impulses of imagination or the malicious suggestions of Iago. The progressive preparation for the catastrophe is wonderfully managed from the Moor's first gallant recital of the story of his love, of "the spells and witchcraft he had used," from his unlooked-for and romantic success, the fond satisfaction with which he dotes on his own happiness, the unreserved tenderness of Desdemona and her innocent importunities in favour of Cassio, irritating the suspicions instilled into her husband's mind by the perfidy of Iago, and rankling there to poison, till he loses all command of himself, and his rage can only be appeased by blood. She is introduced, just before Iago begins to put his scheme in practice, pleading for Cassio with all the thoughtless gaiety of friendship and winning confidence in the love of Othello.

Siegel, Paul N. ed. His Infinite Variety: Major Shakespearean Criticism Since Johnson.
An anthology of major critics from the 18th century to the middle of the 20th century.
Location: General PR 2976 .S45

Shakespeare An Anthology of Criticism and Theory X cover image SlideShare

William Shakespeare's style of writing was borrowed from the conventions of the day and .. "Arden of Faversham" from Shakespeare Survey by Stanley Wells (editor), Cambridge University Press, 2002, 121. Jump Pay To Write Shakespeare Studies Biography Pay To Write Shakespeare Studies Biography up ^ Dotterer, Ronald L.

Hamlet Critical Essays Shakespeare Criticism YouTube Study com

Although the bibliography intends to be as comprehensive as possible, certain types of entries have been omitted: abstracts, announcements, accounts of film-making, dissertations, reports of conferences and courses, reprints (unless they are revised or expanded editions), and works containing only passing references. Interviews have only been listed if they specifically deal with one or several adaptation(s); those referring to a director�s whole �uvre have been discarded. Reviews are usually excluded, with three exceptions: a) those published in Shakespearean journals; b) those that were later reprinted in volumes such as J.

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Critical Essays (Paperback) - …

Appropriation of a Key Text from the Past Critical Essay William Shakespeare s The dark souls

With Hathaway he had three children, two girls and a son, and as a playwright and poet, Shakespeare went on to enjoy moderate success in his time, writing thirty-seven (known) plays and several works of poetry....

Critical essays on Shakespeare's Othello

Matus's Shakespeare, In Fact (Continuum, 1994) is a good book-length examination of the authorship question. My book. the Shakespeare Authorship Question.. from his introduction to the Book of. . the book that originally suggested "Shakespeare. 1728 book, An Essay. Shakespeare authorship question; Baconian theory. Four Essays on the Shakespeare Authorship Question by Michael A'Dair Home | About the Author | Order the Book. Now, if you'd like to know more about who William Shakespeare really was. But the alternate histories offered by people who reject Shakespeares authorship are. first time a recognised Shakespeare scholar has devoted a book. or owned a book. . Bacon was the author Shakespeare and the chief of the poets. London: MacMillan


Macbeth This volume offers a wealth of critical analysis, supported with ample histor- ical and bibliographical information, about one of Shakespeare’s most

Coursen�s Shakespeare on Television: An Anthology of Essays and Reviews (1988); and c) those making reference to virtually unavailable adaptations such as the television series An Age of Kings (1960) or The Spread of the Eagle (1963)."

Critical essays on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet by , 1997, G.K. Hall, Prentice Hall International edition, in English

Holderness, Graham. Shakespeare: The Histories. 2000.
Holderness studies Hamlet, Richard III, Henry VI Part 1, Henry V, Henry IV, and Richard II out of chronological order, focusing on their 1590's context and the contrast between their ideas of masculine power and the female rule of Elizabeth I. Finds the differences more compelling than the similiarities.
Location: General PR 2982 .H594 2000

Essay on A Critical Analysis of Shakespeare's Hamlet 1132 Words | 5 Pages

The character of Iago is one of the supererogations of Shakespear's genius. Some persons, more nice than wise, have thought this whole character unnatural, because his villainy is without a sufficient motive. Shakespear, who was as good a philosopher as he was a poet, thought otherwise. He knew that the love of power, which is another name for the love of mischief, is natural to man. He would know this as well or better than if it had been demonstrated to him by a logical diagram, merely from seeing children paddle in the dirt or kill flies for sport. Iago in fact belongs to a class of character, common to Shakespear and at the same time peculiar to him; whose heads are as acute and active as their hearts are hard and callous. Iago is to be sure an extreme instance of the kind; that is to say, of diseased intellectual activity, with the most perfect indifference to moral good or evil, or rather with a decided preference of the latter, because it falls more readily in with his favourite propensity, gives greater zest to his thoughts and scope to his actions. He is quite or nearly as indifferent to his own fate as to that of others; he runs all risks fo a trifling and doubtful advantage; and is himself the dupe and victim of his ruling passion-an in-satiable craving after action of the most difficult and dangerous kind. "Our ancient" is a philosopher, who fancies that a lie that kills has more point in it than an alliteration or an antithesis; who thinks a fatal experiment on the peace of a family a better thing than watching the palpitations in the heart of a flea in a microscope; who plots the ruin of his friends as an exercise for his ingenuity, and stabs men in the dark to prevent ennui. His gaiety, such as it is, arises from the success of his treachery; his ease from the torture he has inflicted on others. He is an amateur of tragedy in real life; and instead of employing his invention on imaginary characters, or long-forgotten incidents, he takes the bolder and more desperate course of getting up his plot at home, casts the principal parts among his nearest friends and connections, and rehearses it in down-right earnest, with steady nerves and unabated resolution. We will just give an illustration or two.
One of his most characteristic speeches is that immediately after the marriage of Othello.