such as nationalization of private lands and ..

The main question is the role of ideology and the

A native of Greensboro, North Carolina, Harry L. Watson is the Atlanta Distinguished Professor in Southern Culture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he has taught since 1976. His writes and teaches on the antebellum South, the early American republic, and the state of North Carolina. Watson has written four books, including (1990, revised edition 2006) and (1997), and has coedited three collections of essays. He directed the university’s Center for the Study of the American South from 1999 to 2012 and coedits its quarterly journal, . He has also been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center and has served as the president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.

William G. Thomas III is the John and Catherine Angle Professor in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. A 2016 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, Thomas is also a faculty fellow of the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities and currently serves on the National Historical Publications and Records Commission of the National Archives and Records Administration. He was a cofounder and director of the Virginia Center for Digital History at the University of Virginia, where he was an assistant and associate professor of history in the Corcoran Department of History. He was a coeditor the award-winning digital project, Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War. With Edward L. Ayers, he coauthored "The Differences Slavery Made: A Close Analysis of Two American Communities," one of the first pieces of digital scholarship published in the American Historical Review. In 2008 he was awarded a Digital Innovation Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, and he has received numerous grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has also published essays in Civil War History, The Journal of Historical Geography, The New York Times, EDUCAUSE Review, and Inside Higher Education. His books include The Iron Way: Railroads, the Civil War, and the Making of Modern America (2011), a shortlist finalist for the Lincoln Prize. He is currently writing a book called "A Question of Freedom: American Families and Slavery in the Age of Revolution," chronicling the history of black, white, and mixed families in Prince George’s County, Maryland, and early Washington, D.C., and the burst of freedom suits and manumission in the Chesapeake from the Revolution to the Civil War.

Lisa Tetrault is an associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University. She is the author of The Myth of Seneca Falls: Memory and the Women's Suffrage Movement, 1848–1898 (2014), which won the OAH Mary Jurich Nickliss Book Prize. She is the recipient of long-term fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Newberry Library, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress. She also spent a year in residence at Harvard University's Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History. Tetrault specializes in memory, social movements (particularly feminism), Reconstruction, political economy, and women's health. She is currently at work on two new book projects: a new narrative about post–Civil War women's rights activism and a history of intimate partner violence from the founding of the nation to the present.

The party or festivecelebration may take place at any point in the tale and, sometimes, there mayeven be a succession of parties.

The sounds of music and the German language have played a significant role in the developing symbolism of the German nation. In light of the historical division of Germany into many disparate political entities and regional groups, German artists and intellectuals of the 19th and early 20th centuries conceived of musical and linguistic dispositions as the nation's most palpable common ground. According to this view, the peculiar sounds of German music and of the German language provided a direct conduit to national identity, to the deepest recesses of the German soul. So strong is this legacy of sound is still prevalent in modern German culture that philosopher Peter Sloterdijk, in a recent essay, did not even hesitate to describe post-wall Germany as an "acoustical body."

and in the nationalization of the land to break the ..

The sounds of music and the German language have played a significant role in the developing symbolism of the German nation. In light of the historical division of Germany into many disparate political entities and regional groups, German artists and intellectuals of the 19th and early 20th centuries conceived of musical and linguistic dispositions as the nation's most palpable common ground. According to this view, the peculiar sounds of German music and of the German language provided a direct conduit to national identity, to the deepest recesses of the German soul. So strong is this legacy of sound is still prevalent in modern German culture that philosopher Peter Sloterdijk, in a recent essay, did not even hesitate to describe post-wall Germany as an "acoustical body."

breached the privacy of trade union members and ..

My examplesrepresent narratives of adult respondents, with texts about celebratingweddings among the Udmurt and Bashkir people.

A professor of history at the University of California, Riverside, Steven W. Hackel specializes in colonial America, the Spanish borderlands, California missions, and California Indians. A leading scholar of Spanish California, he is the author of Junípero Serra: California’s Founding Father (2013), a comprehensive biography drawing on extensive archival research in Spain, Mexico, and California, and the award-winning Children of Coyote, Missionaries of Saint Francis: Indian-Spanish Relations in Colonial California, 1769-1850 (2005), a sweeping examination of Spanish California centered on Indian life in Mission San Carlos which Serra established in Monterey in 1770. Hackel is also the author of numerous articles on Spanish California and the editor of a volume of essays on colonial California, Alta California: People in Motion, Identities in Formation (2010). He is the general editor of the Huntington Library’s Early California Population Project, a database of the baptism, marriage, and burial records from all of California’s twenty-one missions, and the director of the Early California Cultural Atlas, a spatial history of colonial California funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Born and raised in California, Hackel is a member of the board of directors of the California Missions Foundation, the California Missions Studies Association, and the Historical Society of Southern California.

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The presentation intends to share the outcomes of theabove-mentioned third-phase research project that commenced in the middle ofthe 1990s investigating in what way local society has altered after the changeof regime (1990), when such fundamental challenges had to be faced asre-privatisation and drastically increased unemployment.


Questions following each essay prompt readers to examine and discuss everyday issues of race and opportunity in their own classrooms and schools

Allen C. Guelzo is the Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and the director of Civil War era studies at Gettysburg College. He is the author of Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (1999) and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (2004), both of which won the Lincoln Prize, as well as Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America (2008); a volume of essays, Abraham Lincoln as a Man of Ideas (2009); and Lincoln: A Very Short Introduction (2009). Most recently, he is the author of Fateful Lightning: A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (2012); Gettysburg: The Last Invasion (2013), which won a third Lincoln Prize and the inaugural Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History; Lincoln: An Intimate Portrait (2014); and Redeeming the Great Emancipator (2016). With Patrick Allitt and Gary W. Gallagher, he team-taught The Teaching Company’s new edition of its American history series; his courses on Abraham Lincoln, American intellectual history, the American Revolution, and great history writers are also available on .

They will be discussing the introduction to Regina Kunzel’s Criminal Intimacy: Prison and the Uneven History of Modern …

In the 1980s and early 1990s, the Shreveport, La., native toured nursing homes in the South as a magician with country singer David Houston. Burks moved to Lexington in the early 1990s because his wife was from the area. In 2000, Burks ran for the state House as a Libertarian, but he collected only 330 votes. Then he became a local celebrity. Most afternoons, he ate lunch at the same downtown restaurant with an entourage of managers. Conference calls with investors were posted on YouTube. He produced glossy brochures touting the company.